How to Run a Business in a Politically-Fluid World I Fortune – Sharing #Fortune #Magazine #videos



Global business is being rocked by political change. Brexit. The US election. Tensions in Asia. Populist and protectionist forces across the globe. Who will shape the new global economic order? Where will the trends and forces of globalization lead? To be successful, business leaders need to step outside their usual roles and plan for today’s “geopolitics of change.” This conversation will provide critical insights into what’s happening in the U.S., Europe, China and elsewhere in the global economy–and what this means for Asian executives working to build prosperous futures for their companies.

Discussion Leaders:
Nina Easton, Fortune
Syaru Shirley Lin, Professor, Chinese University of Hong Kong and University of Virginia
Eunice Yoon, China Bureau Chief and Senior Correspondent, CNBC

Interviewer: Alan Murray, Chief Content Officer, Time Inc.; Editor-in-Chief, Fortune

– See more at: http://www.fortuneconferences.com/mpw-international-asia-2017/2017-agenda-overview/#sthash.JHQyPiEx.dpuf

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FORTUNE is a global leader in business journalism with a worldwide circulation of more than 1 million and a readership of nearly 5 million, with major franchises including the FORTUNE 500 and the FORTUNE 100 Best Companies to Work For. FORTUNE Live Media extends the brand’s mission into live settings, hosting a wide range of annual conferences, including the FORTUNE Global Forum.

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Business News – JPMorgan’s Jamie Dimon gushes about tax cuts

Is Blockchain's CEO throwing shade at Jamie Dimon?

You can count JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon as another big fan of President Trump’s corporate tax cut — even though it cost his company more than $2 billion last quarter.

Dimon called tax reform “a significant positive outcome for the country” in a statement released with the bank’s earnings report Friday.

“U.S. companies will be more competitive globally, which will ultimately benefit all Americans,” Dimon added. “The cumulative effect of retained and reinvested capital in the U.S. will help grow the economy, ultimately growing jobs and wages.”

Dimon also said that the company would increase and accelerate some of its investments in employees. He didn’t elaborate, but that could be code for wage increases or special bonuses.

On a conference call with reporters, JPMorgan Chase chief financial officer Marianne Lake said more details would be announced in the coming weeks.

She also suggested that the company could reward investors with more stock buybacks and increased dividends.

Several other large companies, including JPMorgan Chase (JPM) rivals Bank of America (BAC), Fifth Third (FITB) and Wells Fargo (WFC), have already announced plans to boost salaries and give out bonuses.

Still, the tax cut approved by Congress and signed into law by Trump late last year did cut into JPMorgan Chase’s profit in the fourth quarter.

Related: Trump may weaken ‘outdated’ rules that force banks to lend to the poor

Earnings fell 37% from a year ago, to $4.2 billion. That was mainly due to one-time charges totaling $2.4 billion. The bank had to write down the value of its deferred tax assets — JPMorgan’s tax rate is about to go down, making those assets worth less. Other banks are expected to do the same when they report their fourth quarter results.

But excluding the short-term hit from tax reform, JPMorgan Chase said that profit fell just 1% to $6.7 billion, or $1.8 billion. That topped Wall Street’s forecasts,

Revenue grew 5% as well, to $25.5 billion. That also was better than what analysts were expecting. JPMorgan Chase said that the increase was led by rising interest rates as well growth in loans and deposits for consumers.

The one down spot for the bank? Revenue from its markets division plunged 26% in the quarter from a year ago.

The lack of volatility in the stock and bond markets lately is actually not a good thing for big banks. They do better when markets are a little noisier since that tends to lead to increased fees from trading.

JPMorgan Chase also said it lost $143 million on a margin loan to one client. During the call, Lake revealed it was to struggling South African retailer Steinhoff, which has been hit by an accounting scandal.

CNNMoney (New York) First published January 12, 2018: 7:53 AM ET




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Technology News – Why is health care so damn expensive?


Never has there been more talk of innovation and yet more disappointment in the future than in the health care industry. AngelList shows almost a thousand startups just in the digital health space alone, and VCs invested $3.5 billion in digital health startups in just the first half of 2017 according to Rock Health’s industry analysis. There are dozens of health innovation conferences hosted in the United States every year, with participants chattering, chattering, chattering about this or that “innovation.”

All of that innovation has done practically nothing though to fix the single worst problem of modern American health care: it’s cost. Health care in the United States has never been more expensive. The United States is spending about $3.5 trillion a year on health care expenses, an increase of 12,300% since 1960. In that timeframe, health care spending increased from 5% of U.S. GDP to about 17.5% of GDP.

Despite all of that spending, the age-adjusted mortality rate for Americans has declined practically every year since 1980. Unsurprisingly, life expectancy for Americans — among the most typical metrics for measuring broad health and wellness outcomes for a country — declined for the second year in a row in 2017.

It’s Juicero innovation at its finest. We’re paying more, way more, than we used to, and yet our outcomes have never been worse.

This is the problem known as “cost disease” — the rapidly escalating costs of basic human services like health care, housing, education, construction, and infrastructure. It’s a problem that plagues the developed world, but none more so than in the United States. Scott Alexander, who blogs at Slate Star Codex, wrote a masterful summary of the problem a year ago that’s worth reading for how this pattern seems to emerge across all of these industries.

It is one thing though to identify the pattern, and it’s another to start to tease out the reasons why costs have spiraled 123x in just a few decades. The pithy answer is that there is no pithy answer: industries like construction and healthcare are simply too complicated to have a simple response to the question of cost disease. It’s literally all the answers and none of them at the same time.

There is a slowly growing understanding in policy circles that cost is the fundamental challenge to improving America’s human services and infrastructure. The tradeoffs required in American medicine — offering better care or offering more care to more people would simply be moot if the overall cost of health care was 9% of GDP instead of 17.5% — the median percentage in the OECD group of industrialized countries.

Call me cynical, but having talked with dozens of digital health startups over the past few years, this basic fact so rarely seems to register with founders. Entrepreneurs are trying to digitalize medical records, or improve operating room efficiency through better analytics, or create a new (and expensive!) robotic medical device. These innovations are important, but they are a bit like rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic to try to right-size the ship: actions far too small to make a difference.

This problem is thankfully starting to be addressed by startups head on. One startup is Avant-garde Health, which publicly announced a $4 million seed round led by General Catalyst, Tectonic Ventures, and Founders Collective this week (the round was closed mid-last year).

I chatted with Derek Haas, who is the founder and CEO of the company and who has spent the last few years completely immersed in the challenges of controlling the rampant cost disease in American hospitals.

If you are wondering what one of the main drivers of cost disease in health care is, it likely starts with the fact that few hospitals and providers actually know what their costs are except for aggregated numbers. We can cue a facepalm emoji, but the reality is that it is really hard to do this sort of analysis with existing management systems.

The company’s solution is to use a technique called “activity-based costing” and apply it to the health industry. The idea is to try to accurately assign every expense of an organization to the exact activity that created that cost. In the healthcare context, Avant-garde uses “time-driven” costing to assign expenses to treatment. The goal, Haas explained, is “to understand for each patient what care is delivered, who delivered that care, and how much time did it take to deliver that care.”

So, for instance, every health professional that sees a surgery patient needs to assign exactly their time to that patient so that the true cost of that surgery can be calculated and analyzed. A nurse who spends 20 minutes in the room needs to assign one third of their hourly rate to the patient.

Now, this sort of costing can sound like an MBA’s godsend or a patient’s worst nightmare (let alone the providers who need to input their timecards). However, Haas’ data from the last few years though shows that the tradeoff between quality of care and cost often doesn’t have to be made. “What we frequently observe is that the biggest drivers of cost and delivery of care is the volume of care,” he explained. In other words, surgeons who conduct more surgeries both have more experience — improving outcomes — while also cutting the cost of each surgery by amortizing their income across more patients.

In addition to volume, standardized treatment is also key. “When you look at organizations with more standardization in how care is delivered, those organizations are getting better outcomes and are often more cost-effective” to boot Haas said.

For example, Avant-garde worked with the Penn State Hershey Medical Center to improve the efficiency of Total Hip Arthroplasty surgery (i.e. a hip replacement). What the hospital found is that different surgeons were using different hip components at different rates, increasing the total supply cost of the surgery. With improved analytics and physician education, the hospital was able to save $842 per surgery with minimal change to outcomes.

Today, Avant-garde is focused on just collecting and analyzing cost data. Its long-term goal though is to attach those costs to actual patient outcomes so that administrators can understand when additional spending is helping patients, and when it doesn’t. “People are often making decisions based on perceived quality, rather than actual outcomes,” Haas said. By getting better outcomes data, hospitals can start to help consumers get better treatment at lower expense.

Avant-garde is not a panacea to our healthcare cost disease. But it is a step in the right direction. By quantifying aspects of the healthcare business that are today opaque, management is being given the tools to actually make the right decisions on behalf of patients and payers.

That in many ways is the story of cost disease in every industry. What looks like a tradeoff can often be recast as a win-win situation. Lowering infrastructure costs can suddenly mean not choosing between three subway routes, but doing all of them. We suddenly don’t have to choose between new technology in classrooms and lower class sizes. And we don’t need to choose between limiting treatment and offering insurance to more people. For founders thinking about making an impact, there’s a trillion dollar idea right here.

Featured Image: DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images




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Successful Women: What Drives Women? | Driven Women | Ford

Successful Women: What Drives Women? | Driven Women | Ford



During Women’s History Month, Sheryl Connelly, Ford Global Consumer Trends & Futuring Manager, sat down with impressive women across several industries to hear what drives them.

Three thought leaders – Stephanie Laing, Executive Producer at HBO, Jennifer Senior, Author of All Joy and No Fun, and Alana Strager, Ford F-150 Innovations Leader – sit down to share experiences from their respective fields and advice on how to break through the glass ceiling by changing the external and internal dialogues. Join the conversation on social media using #SheDrivesWeDrive.

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The official YouTube channel for Ford Motor Company. Subscribe for weekly videos showcasing our vehicles, innovation and stories that inspire you to go further. Our videos are here for your entertainment, and you are welcome to use the share and embed links for all our videos, but the videos themselves are property of Ford Motor Company. You are not permitted to download any video and re-upload under any circumstances without written consent from Ford Motor Company.

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Volvo A60H articulated hauler: Operate comfortably

Volvo A60H articulated hauler: Operate comfortably



Maintain productivity all day, every day in the Volvo Care Cab, providing a spacious and comfortable work environment. Experience superior levels of comfort, control, ease of operation and safety with a centrally positioned adjustable seat, superb visibility, easy-to-use controls as well as noise and vibration insulation. Step inside and see for yourself why the Volvo Care Cab is operators’ number one choice.

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100 Betonmischer in einer Minute super Zeitraffer am Dreischeibenhaus

100 Betonmischer in einer Minute super Zeitraffer am Dreischeibenhaus



Das Fundament wird gegossen 2 Betonpumpen und über 100 Betonmischer, das wird die Zufahrt für das neue Parkhaus am Dreischeiben Haus in Düsseldorf
truck concrete mixer

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The National Mall has a story, Episode 6: Earthquake- JohnDeere Videos

The National Mall has a story, Episode 6: Earthquake



Episode 6, Earthquake. Washington, DC was rocked by a 5.8 magnitude earthquake and buffeted by brutal winds as well as hammered by pounding rain back in 2011. The event cracked the Washington Monument. The repairs were completed and the Washington Monument re-opened May 12, 2014. But in many ways the work to save the entire National Mall has just begun. Learn all about it and see how to pitch in at http://www.JohnDeere.com/SportsTurf.

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Liebherr R944C excavator with big Hydraram HCC 65V concrete shear of Hein Heun



Liebherr R944C excavator from demolition contractor Hein Heun (http://www.heinheun.nl) with Hydraram (http://www.hydraram.com) HCC 65V concrete shear. The Hydraram HCC 65V concrete shear has an operational weight of 6.500 kg. It is for machines in the range of 50-85 tons. The concrete shear has an opening of 1.680 mm. and has a cutting force of 145 tons on the teeth at the maximum opening. Hein Heun is using their new HCC 65V concrete shear on their Liebherr R944C excavator on a demolition project in Deinum. Demolition of the old Westergobrug.

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Technology News – The secret to avoiding CES cynicism is never really going

I’ve been going to CES for almost ten years now, and it amazes me that really, nothing has changed that whole time. The same people are saying the same things on the same stages, selling the same people the same junk with slightly higher price tags. But this year I had a great time and found some amazing companies — because I avoided at all costs actually stepping foot on the show floor.

The math is simple: when a company gets big enough to get itself a big booth showing off its products, it is almost always at that point that it ceases to be a source of real innovation — or at least the kind of innovation I think is worth tracking down and writing about at CES. They don’t do anything truly cool, nor anything truly dumb.

And I’m not punishing them for their success. I’ve seen some of these companies grow up from nothing to a flashy booth staffed by dozens, and that’s great. But they exist on a different plane now: they seed their news with sites ahead of time, they have private press conferences, they’re working in suites to set up sweetheart manufacturing deals. They’re part of the machine now. Congratulations!

(The most eloquent summary of this side of the show came from a cab driver. After he asked about the latest advances to the TV ecosystem, we explained — something about OLED versus Micro-LED and refresh rates and other things that make almost no difference. “And is it cheaper or more expensive?” he asked with a straight face — then he cracked a grin and laughed uproariously. He knew the score, and with a single question reduced the whole industry to a pack of charlatans, which is exactly right. That was probably my favorite moment of the entire week.)

It’s for this reason that I spent my entire time at CES roaming the hot, shabby wilds that are “Eureka Park.”

A small portion of the Eureka Park map.

Technically it is part of the show, but it’s also like hell. Hundreds of booths perhaps six feet wide and deep are crammed in, CEOs displaying their wares like butchers or street merchants. It’s hot and humid (even in the cold, usually dry Las Vegas January), there’s barely room to move along the inadequate aisles, and if anyone sees you’re media they make a sort of flying pitch at you to pique your interest au volant.

Normally I’d hate this kind of thing, but of course I’d do anything for our glorious parent companies. And actually, this is where pretty much everything cool is.

Sure, you can find crazy gadgets and knockoffs in the innumerable Chinese manufacturers, and the likes of LG have things like roll-up OLED screens, but these are no more than novelties, both for the companies themselves and those viewing them. The companies at Eureka Park are generally startups with one product or service that they’ve put all their money and time behind; they really care about this stuff.

That earnestness is endearing and makes for a good story — though not necessarily a good idea. I passed by hundreds of booths full of things no one needs and I suspect no one wants, services doomed to languish in obscurity, or devices surfing on a trend that won’t last out the year. (Just how many smartwatches do they think we need?)

Every once in a while, though, you hit the trifecta: a smart piece of technology being created for a worthwhile purpose by people who actually care about both. I dare you to find anything like that in any of the main halls.

This year I found a few examples of this. The first one I visited was LifeDoor, a device that closes a door it’s attached to when it hears a smoke alarm go off. Here’s something that could save lives (really), is simply yet purposefully designed, and created by a few people (including firefighters) who saw a chance to make something that helped others.

Another gadget I found seemed too good to be true, so much so that I requested third party documentation that it works. It was Lishtot’s TestDrop, a device smaller than a keyfob that instantly and reliably tells you if water is drinkable without even touching it. Wouldn’t you be skeptical? This company didn’t really even have its own booth; it was listed under the “Israel Export Institute.” An affordable device that could save thousands of lives, and it has less room dedicated to it than Samsung’s cheapest TV!




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Cat® D8R (C15 ACERT™) Dozer Excels in Desert Productivity Test – caterpillar Videos and products

Cat® D8R (C15 ACERT™) Dozer Excels in Desert Productivity Test



http://bit.ly/2lfEtUm See how the Cat® D8R Dozer, with a proven C15 ACERT engine, performed in a desert productivity test against the previous model D8R bulldozer from Caterpillar.

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2011 NEFA Funding Symposium Announcement



Great content and exciting new ways of delivering it! The NEFA 2011 Funding Symposium, September 15-17, in Minneapolis, MN, is just the place to make the connections and learn the techniquest that will rebuild your business for today’s new market. Get more information at: www.NEFAssociation.org.

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Business News – Airbus built a lot of planes for China last year – but can’t deliver them

5 stunning stats about Airbus

Airbus needs China’s blessing on its newest jetliners. And without it, undelivered planes are piling up at its factories in France and Germany.

The company wanted to sell nearly 200 more Airbus jets to China this week. But Chinese airlines have yet to take delivery of many airliners they’ve ordered from the company even though the planes are built.

That’s because China’s aviation regulator has yet to allow deliveries of key Airbus (EADSF) models.

Across Airbus’s factories in Germany and France, more than a dozen A320neo and A321neos, some that were ready as far back as last spring, have been in storage awaiting final sign-offs from the Civil Aviation Administration of China. About a half-dozen A350s for Chinese carriers are waiting at its main headquarters in Toulouse in southern France.

Winning regulatory approval in China, the world’s largest airplane market over the next two decades, is crucial as Airbus and Boeing (BA) pin their future hopes on China.

Precisely what has slowed Airbus’ approvals in China isn’t entirely clear. The delays have more to do with politics than technology, say several people familiar with the regulatory delays. The delays are wrapped up in an extended wish list from Beijing that ranges from new safety agreements with Europe to additional production in China.

This is business diplomacy at work, said Richard Aboulafia, vice president of analysis at the Teal Group aerospace consultancy.

“Jetliner purchases are a continuation of politics by any other means,” Aboulafia said. China’s ascendant role in aerospace as both competitor and customer gives them unique leverage over Boeing and Airbus. “Their actual buying clout greatly exceeds their market size.”

And Airbus is clearly making an effort to please the Chinese government.

During a visit this week by French President Emmanuel Macron with Chinese President Xi Jinping, the European planemaker announced it would increase production at its final assembly line in the Chinese city of Tianjin from four A320 jets each month to six by 2020. Airbus has even floated the idea of a new industrial partnership with China on the world’s biggest jetliner, the A380. Orders are badly needed on that program.

Airbus Chief Operating Officer Fabrice Brégier met during a visit to Beijing in late October with CAAC director Feng Zhenglin to discuss Airbus’s business operations in China, including aircraft airworthiness certification. An Airbus spokesman declined to say if the outstanding certification of Airbus’s newest jets was discussed.

Neither the CAAC nor the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs responded to a request for comment about certification delays.

Delta set to place huge order with Airbus

Airbus disputed the idea that political issues are affecting the pace of Chinese approvals.

“This is a technical validation process … not a political one,” a spokesman for the company said. “The number of aircraft is small, and these will be delivered in the short term.”

China’s aviation regulator is considered one of the most methodical and rigorous on the planet. But in the Chinese aerospace industry, much of what happens is linked to the country’s long-term ambitions to compete against Boeing and Airbus.

“The Chinese are pretty good in building pressure on certain desires they have,” said one senior Airbus official. “The Chinese are playing it slow on granting [certification] on any aircraft program, be it Boeing or Airbus.”

Only in the closing days of last year was Airbus awarded Chinese certification for its new A321neo with Pratt & Whitney engines, the company said. That approval came nearly a year after many of the planes on order had already been made. Both A320neo and A321neo jets with CFM International engines have yet to win Chinese approval.

It’s common practice in the airplane business to add more orders even when previous commitments haven’t been fulfilled. Chinese carriers took delivery of 424 airliners from Airbus and Boeing and other manufacturers in 2017, according to trade publication Air Transport World.

Getting approval from the Chinese regulator has often come closely times around political visits that accompany other deals. Boeing won Chinese certification for its single-aisle 737 Max in mid-October, just before a visit to the country by President Trump in November.

Trump & Boeing: It’s not about Air Force One, it’s about China

The U.S. and China also signed a new aviation safety agreement last fall after more than 10 years of negotiations.

The Federal Aviation Administration denied there was any connection around the bilateral agreement and timing of aircraft certification.

China is in the middle of finalizing a new bilateral aviation safety agreement with Europe that would recognize China’s airworthiness standards. That would provide a major boost to Chinese plane makers and suppliers, who want to eventually sell Chinese-made airliners in Europe.

China’s first direct competitor to Boeing and Airbus’s dominant single-aisle jets, the Comac C919, made its first test flight in May 2017.

China over the years has asked Airbus to intervene with the European Aviation Safety Agency and the European Commission to help expedite the talks over the aviation safety agreement, say two people familiar with the requests. As the negotiations dragged on, so did the pace of certification.

The talks between China and the European Commission were successfully completed in December, according to a European Commission spokesman.

The agreement is expected to be signed in June, which the Commission says it expects will help advance certification for “European aviation products” in China.

CNNMoney (Seattle) First published January 12, 2018: 3:57 PM ET




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Знакомство с Chevrolet Cruze 1.8 – Chevrolet Videos

Знакомство с Chevrolet Cruze 1.8



Я в ВК https://vk.com/obzortachek
Группа https://vk.com/tachki_kirovsk
[обзор и тест-драйв Шевроле Круз]
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GMC Canada Commercial – “Touch Screen” – Commercial for GMC Trucks Canada Wide Clearance

GMC Canada Commercial -  "Touch Screen" -   Commercial for GMC Trucks Canada Wide Clearance



GMC Canada Commercial – “Touch Screen” – Commercial for GMC Trucks Canada Wide Clearance

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Großbaustelle CEMEX BETON S58SX

Großbaustelle CEMEX BETON S58SX



Mega Bauprojekt Kö Bogen in Düsseldorf, nach dem Abriss des Tausendfüßlers wird die Straßenbahn zur U-Bahn und die Autos gehen in den Tunnel.

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