SOLD! Oh Canada. Bobcat 753G w/ 1060 hrs! Cab HEAT! Call Jeff – Tri-State Bobcat 715-781-3940 – Heavy Construction Videos on youtube

Bobcat 753G w

Recorded on June 24, 2010 using a Flip Video camera.

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Plans fail for lack of counsel, but with many advisers they succeed.

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Tropical Weather Forecast



We’re likely to see a tropical system form in the Caribbean over the next few days.

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Volvo CE Operators Movie – 09 Instruments And Controls — G Series Wheel Loaders – Part 9 of 11



Check out this playlist of short movies to help make the operation of your Volvo CE G-Series Wheel Loaders more productive, safer and fuel efficient.

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Heavy Equipment Operator (Episode 19)


Brian visits a heavy equipment operator in Fort St. John who works on road construction, pipelines and major excavations. He shows Brian how to maintain equipment safety, and describes other careers in the industry closely related to heavy equipment.

Check out these websites to learn more about choosing a career and finding a job in British Columbia:
http://www.careertrekbc.ca
http://www.workbc.ca

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Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, the new creation has come: The old has gone, the new is here!

New manufacturing process for SiC power devices opens market to more competition — ScienceDaily

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Researchers from North Carolina State University are rolling out a new manufacturing process and chip design for silicon carbide (SiC) power devices, which can be used to more efficiently regulate power in technologies that use electronics. The process — called PRESiCE — was developed with support from the PowerAmerica Institute funded by the Department of Energy to make it easier for companies to enter the SiC marketplace and develop new products.

“PRESiCE will allow more companies to get into the SiC market, because they won’t have to initially develop their own design and manufacturing process for power devices — an expensive, time-consuming engineering effort,” says Jay Baliga, Distinguished University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at NC State and lead author of a paper on PRESiCE that will be presented later this month. “The companies can instead use the PRESiCE technology to develop their own products. That’s good for the companies, good for consumers, and good for U.S. manufacturing.”

Power devices consist of a diode and transistor, and are used to regulate the flow of power in electrical devices. For decades, electronics have used silicon-based power devices. In recent years, however, some companies have begun using SiC power devices, which have two key advantages.

First, SiC power devices are more efficient, because SiC transistors lose less power. Conventional silicon transistors lose 10 percent of their energy to waste heat. SiC transistors lose only 7 percent. This is not only more efficient, but means that product designers need to do less to address cooling for the devices.

Second, SiC devices can also switch at a higher frequency. That means electronics incorporating SiC devices can have smaller capacitors and inductors — allowing designers to create smaller, lighter electronic products.

But there’s a problem.

Up to this point, companies that have developed manufacturing processes for creating SiC power devices have kept their processes proprietary — making it difficult for other companies to get into the field. This has limited the participation of other companies and kept the cost of SiC devices high.

The NC State researchers developed PRESiCE to address this bottleneck, with the goal of lowering the barrier of entry to the field for companies and increasing innovation.

The PRESiCE team worked with a Texas-based foundry called X-Fab to implement the manufacturing process and have now qualified it — showing that it has the high yield and tight statistical distribution of electrical properties for SiC power devices necessary to make them attractive to industry.

“If more companies get involved in manufacturing SiC power devices, it will increase the volume of production at the foundry, significantly driving down costs,” Baliga says.

Right now, SiC devices cost about five times more than silicon power devices.

“Our goal is to get it down to 1.5 times the cost of silicon devices,” Baliga says. “Hopefully that will begin the ‘virtuous cycle’: lower cost will lead to higher use; higher use leads to greater production volume; greater production volume further reduces cost, and so on. And consumers are getting a better, more energy-efficient product.”

The researchers have already licensed the PRESiCE process and chip design to one company, and are in talks with several others.

“I conceived the development of wide bandgap semiconductor (SiC) power devices in 1979 and have been promoting the technology for more than three decades,” Baliga says. “Now, I feel privileged to have created PRESiCE as the nation’s technology for manufacturing SiC power devices to generate high-paying jobs in the U.S. We’re optimistic that our technology can expedite the commercialization of SiC devices and contribute to a competitive manufacturing sector here in the U.S.,” Baliga says.

The paper, “PRESiCE: PRocess Engineered for manufacturing SiC Electronic-devices,” will be presented at the International Conference on Silicon Carbide and Related Materials, being held Sept. 17-22 in Washington, D.C. The paper is co-authored by W. Sung, now at State University of New York Polytechnic Institute; K. Han and J. Harmon, who are Ph.D. students at NC State; and A. Tucker and S. Syed, who are undergraduates at NC State.

The work was supported by PowerAmerica, the Department of Energy-funded manufacturing innovation institute that focuses on boosting manufacturing of wide bandgap semiconductor-based power electronics.


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They stripped him and put a scarlet robe on him, and then twisted together a crown of thorns and set it on his head. They put a staff in his right hand. Then they knelt in front of him and mocked him. “Hail, king of the Jews!” they said.

Adding phase change materials, like paraffin, to concrete could make roads that melt snow and ice — ScienceDaily

Combining neutron and X-ray imaging gives clues to how ancient weapons were manufactured

Drexel University researchers have made a discovery that could create roads that deice themselves during winter storms. Their secret? — Adding a little paraffin wax to the road’s concrete mix.

In a paper recently published in journal Cement and Concrete Composites researchers, led by Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in Drexel’s College of Engineering, explain how substances like paraffin oil — known as “phase change materials” in chemistry — can be used in concrete to store energy and release it as heat when a road needs a melt-off.

Keeping roads open to travel is a persistent challenge during winter months, but efforts to make them safely passable — including the constant use of snow plows, deicing chemicals and road salt — tend to deteriorate the surface. The chemicals and road salts currently used to melt snow and ice can also have a deleterious environmental impact when surface runoff carries them into nearby ecosystems — which is pretty likely considering the state of Pennsylvania alone dumps more than 900,000 tons of it on roads each winter. So researchers have been searching for a better winter option than salting and plowing for some time.

Farnam’s group in collaboration with researchers from Purdue University and Oregon State University, is among the first to demonstrate that using phase change materials as an environmentally friendly alternative can be just as effective as the standard salting and scraping methods.

“Phase change materials can be incorporated into concrete using porous lightweight aggregate or embedded pipes and when PCM transforms from liquid to solid during cooling events, it can release thermal heat that can be used to melt ice and snow,” Farnam said. “By inhibiting the formation of ice and snow on the pavement or bridge surface, the use of PCM may reduce or eliminate the need for deicing chemicals/salts, snowplowing or both — thus saving money and positively influencing the environmental impact of such operations.”

Paraffin oil, a common ingredient in candles, wax polishes, cosmetics and water-proofing compounds, was their material of choice for this endeavor because it is organic, widely available, chemically stable and relatively inexpensive. Like all phase change materials, it releases thermal energy when it changes its physical state, which means as temperatures drop and the oil begins to solidify it releases energy through latent heat of fusion. This means paraffin oil can be tailored to embed deicing capabilities in a road surface so that it becomes thermally active during snow events or when deicing is needed.

To test its snow and ice-melting ability, the team created a set of concrete slabs — one with paraffin-filled pipes inside, one containing porous lightweight aggregate that had been infused with paraffin, and a third reference slab without paraffin. Each was sealed in an insulated container and then covered with about five inches of lab-made “snow.”

With temperatures inside the boxes held between 35-44 degrees Fahrenheit, both of the paraffin-treated slabs were able to completely melt the snow within the first 25 hours of testing, while the snow on the reference sample remained frozen. The slab with the paraffin-filled tubes melted the snow slightly faster than the one composed of paraffin-treated aggregate. Farnam suggests that this is because the paraffin inside the tubes is able to solidify more quickly — thus releasing its energy — because of the regular diameter of the pipes. While the diameter of the pores of the aggregate vary in size.

But in the group’s second experiment, in which the ambient air temperature in the box was lowered to freezing before the snow was added, the paraffin-treated aggregate was more effective than the embedded pipes. This is because the capillary pore pressure delayed the freezing of the paraffin, thus allowing it to release its heat energy over a longer period of time.

“The gradual heat release due to the different pore sizes in porous light-weight aggregate is more beneficial in melting snow when concrete is exposed to variety of temperature changes when snow melting or deicing is needed,” Farnam said. “We believe that using porous lightweight aggregate can be potential way of incorporating phase change materials in concrete as it is easy to be implemented in practice and can cover environmental conditions of various locations in the US dealing with snow, especially melting snow or deicing in roads and bridges in the Northeast.”

One of the first uses of this infrastructure technology could be at airports, where keeping runways clear of snow and ice is vital and a perpetual challenge in the winter. The Federal Aviation Administration supported this research as part of its Heated Airport Pavements Project in its Partnership to Enhance General Aviation Safety, Accessibility and Sustainability program.

“Additional research is needed to further understand other factors influencing concrete constructability, including concrete fresh and hardened performance when the concrete contains phase change materials, and the phase change material’s thermal performance in different locations in the U.S.,” Farnam said. “Eventually this could be used to reduce the amount of deicing chemicals we use or can be used as a new deicing method to improve the safety of roads and bridges. But before it can be incorporated, we will need to better understand how it affects durability of concrete pavement, skid resistance and long-term stability.”


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But to you who are listening I say: Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you.

UH researchers discover new form of stretchable electronics, sensors and skins — ScienceDaily

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A team of researchers from the University of Houston has reported a breakthrough in stretchable electronics that can serve as an artificial skin, allowing a robotic hand to sense the difference between hot and cold, while also offering advantages for a wide range of biomedical devices.

The work, reported in the journal Science Advances, describes a new mechanism for producing stretchable electronics, a process that relies upon readily available materials and could be scaled up for commercial production.

Cunjiang Yu, Bill D. Cook Assistant Professor of mechanical engineering and lead author for the paper, said the work is the first to create a semiconductor in a rubber composite format, designed to allow the electronic components to retain functionality even after the material is stretched by 50 percent.

The work is the first semiconductor in rubber composite format that enables stretchability without any special mechanical structure, Yu said.

He noted that traditional semiconductors are brittle and using them in otherwise stretchable materials has required a complicated system of mechanical accommodations. That’s both more complex and less stable than the new discovery, as well as more expensive, he said.

“Our strategy has advantages for simple fabrication, scalable manufacturing, high-density integration, large strain tolerance and low cost,” he said.

Yu and the rest of the team – co-authors include first author Hae-Jin Kim, Kyoseung Sim and Anish Thukral, all with the UH Cullen College of Engineering – created the electronic skin and used it to demonstrate that a robotic hand could sense the temperature of hot and iced water in a cup. The skin also was able to interpret computer signals sent to the hand and reproduce the signals as American Sign Language.

“The robotic skin can translate the gesture to readable letters that a person like me can understand and read,” Yu said.

The artificial skin is just one application. Researchers said the discovery of a material that is soft, bendable, stretchable and twistable will impact future development in soft wearable electronics, including health monitors, medical implants and human-machine interfaces.

The stretchable composite semiconductor was prepared by using a silicon-based polymer known as polydimethylsiloxane, or PDMS, and tiny nanowires to create a solution that hardened into a material which used the nanowires to transport electric current.

“We foresee that this strategy of enabling elastomeric semiconductors by percolating semiconductor nanofibrils into a rubber will advance the development of stretchable semiconductors, and … will move forward the advancement of stretchable electronics for a wide range of applications, such as artificial skins, biomedical implants and surgical gloves,” they wrote.

 

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Materials provided by University of Houston. Original written by Jeannie Kever. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


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Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus, because through Christ Jesus the law of the Spirit who gives life has set you free from the law of sin and death.

Expanding polymer enables self-folding without heating or immersion in water. — ScienceDaily

Heavy Construction Photos

As 3-D printing has become a mainstream technology, industry and academic researchers have been investigating printable structures that will fold themselves into useful three-dimensional shapes when heated or immersed in water.

In a paper appearing in the American Chemical Society’s journal Applied Materials and Interfaces, researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and colleagues report something new: a printable structure that begins to fold itself up as soon as it’s peeled off the printing platform.

One of the big advantages of devices that self-fold without any outside stimulus, the researchers say, is that they can involve a wider range of materials and more delicate structures.

“If you want to add printed electronics, you’re generally going to be using some organic materials, because a majority of printed electronics rely on them,” says Subramanian Sundaram, an MIT graduate student in electrical engineering and computer science and first author on the paper. “These materials are often very, very sensitive to moisture and temperature. So if you have these electronics and parts, and you want to initiate folds in them, you wouldn’t want to dunk them in water or heat them, because then your electronics are going to degrade.”

To illustrate this idea, the researchers built a prototype self-folding printable device that includes electrical leads and a polymer “pixel” that changes from transparent to opaque when a voltage is applied to it. The device, which is a variation on the “printable goldbug” that Sundaram and his colleagues announced earlier this year, starts out looking something like the letter “H.” But each of the legs of the H folds itself in two different directions, producing a tabletop shape.

The researchers also built several different versions of the same basic hinge design, which show that they can control the precise angle at which a joint folds. In tests, they forcibly straightened the hinges by attaching them to a weight, but when the weight was removed, the hinges resumed their original folds.

In the short term, the technique could enable the custom manufacture of sensors, displays, or antennas whose functionality depends on their three-dimensional shape. Longer term, the researchers envision the possibility of printable robots.

Sundaram is joined on the paper by his advisor, Wojciech Matusik, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) at MIT; Marc Baldo, also an associate professor of EECS, who specializes in organic electronics; David Kim, a technical assistant in Matusik’s Computational Fabrication Group; and Ryan Hayward, a professor of polymer science and engineering at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Stress relief

The key to the researchers’ design is a new printer-ink material that expands after it solidifies, which is unusual. Most printer-ink materials contract slightly as they solidify, a technical limitation that designers frequently have to work around.

Printed devices are built up in layers, and in their prototypes the MIT researchers deposit their expanding material at precise locations in either the top or bottom few layers. The bottom layer adheres slightly to the printer platform, and that adhesion is enough to hold the device flat as the layers are built up. But as soon as the finished device is peeled off the platform, the joints made from the new material begin to expand, bending the device in the opposite direction.

Like many technological breakthroughs, the CSAIL researchers’ discovery of the material was an accident. Most of the printer materials used by Matusik’s Computational Fabrication Group are combinations of polymers, long molecules that consist of chainlike repetitions of single molecular components, or monomers. Mixing these components is one method for creating printer inks with specific physical properties.

While trying to develop an ink that yielded more flexible printed components, the CSAIL researchers inadvertently hit upon one that expanded slightly after it hardened. They immediately recognized the potential utility of expanding polymers and began experimenting with modifications of the mixture, until they arrived at a recipe that let them build joints that would expand enough to fold a printed device in half.

Whys and wherefores

Hayward’s contribution to the paper was to help the MIT team explain the material’s expansion. The ink that produces the most forceful expansion includes several long molecular chains and one much shorter chain, made up of the monomer isooctyl acrylate. When a layer of the ink is exposed to ultraviolet light — or “cured,” a process commonly used in 3-D printing to harden materials deposited as liquids — the long chains connect to each other, producing a rigid thicket of tangled molecules.

When another layer of the material is deposited on top of the first, the small chains of isooctyl acrylate in the top, liquid layer sink down into the lower, more rigid layer. There, they interact with the longer chains to exert an expansive force, which the adhesion to the printing platform temporarily resists.

The researchers hope that a better theoretical understanding of the reason for the material’s expansion will enable them to design material tailored to specific applications — including materials that resist the 1-3 percent contraction typical of many printed polymers after curing.

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qOW8GrAIvzY


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And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.

Groundwork to better understanding optical properties of glass — ScienceDaily

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Glass is everywhere. Whether someone is gazing out a window or scrolling through a smartphone, odds are that there is a layer of glass between them and whatever it is they’re looking at.

Despite being around for at least 5,000 years, there is still a lot that is unknown about this material, such as how certain glasses form and how they achieve certain properties. Better understanding of this could lead to innovations in technology, such as scratch-free coatings and glass with different mechanical properties.

Over the past few years, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have been looking at properties of stable glasses, closely packed forms of glasses which are produced by depositing molecules from a vapor phase onto a cold substrate.

“There have been a lot of questions,” said Zahra Fakhraai, an associate professor of chemistry in Penn’s School of Arts & Sciences, “about whether this is analogous of the same amorphous state of naturally aged glasses such as amber, which are formed by just cooling a liquid and aging it for many, many years.”

In order to answer these questions, Fahkraai and Ph.D. student Tianyi Liu collaborated with chemistry professor Patrick Walsh who designed and synthesized a new special molecule that is perfectly round with a spherical shape. According to Fakhraai, these unique molecules can never align themselves with any substrate as they are deposited. Because of this, the researchers expected the glasses to be amorphous and isotropic, meaning that their constituent particles, whether they are atoms, colloids or grains, are arranged in a way that has no overarching pattern or order.

Surprisingly, the researchers noticed that these stable glasses are birefringent, meaning the index of refraction of light is different in directions parallel and normal to the substrate, which wouldn’t be expected in a round material. Their results were published in Physical Review Letters.

With birefringence, light shined in one direction will break differently than light shined from a different direction. This effect is often harnessed in liquid crystal displays: changing the orientation of the material causes light to interact differently with it, producing optical effects. In most deposited glasses, this is a result of molecules aligning in a particular direction as they condensate from the vapor phase into a deep glassy state.

The birefringence patterns of the stable glasses were strange, Fakhraai said, as the researchers did not expect any orientation of these round molecules in the material.

After teaming up with physics professor James Kikkawa and Ph.D. student Annemarie Exarhos, who did photoluminescence experiments to look at the orientation of the molecules, and chemistry professor Joseph Subotnick, who helped with the simulations aimed at looking at the crystal structure and calculating the index of refraction of the crystal which allowed them to work out the math of the degree of birefringence or ordering in the amorphous state, the researchers confirmed their hunch that there was no orientation in the material.

Despite measuring zero order in the glass, the scientists still saw an amount of birefringence analogous to having up to 30 percent of the molecules perfectly ordered. Through their experiments, they found that this is due to the layer-by-layer nature of the deposition that allows molecules to pack more tightly in the direction normal to the surface during the deposition. The denser the glass, the higher the value of birefringence. This process can be controlled by changing the substrate temperature that controls the degree of densification.

“We were able to show that this is a unique kind of order that is emergent from the process,” Fakhraai said. “This is a new sort of packing that’s very unique because you don’t have any orientation, but you can still manipulate the molecular distances on average and still have a random but birefringent packing overall. And so this teaches us a lot about the process of how you can actually access these lower state phases but also provides a way of engineering optical properties without necessarily inducing an order or structure in the material.”

Since the stressors are distributed differently in and out of plane, these glasses could have different mechanical properties, which may be useful in coatings and technology. It may be possible to manipulate the orientation of a glass or its layering to give it certain properties, such as anti-scratch coatings.

“We expect that if we were to indent the glass surface with something,” Fakhraai said, “it would have different toughness versus indenting it on the side. This could change its fracture patterns or hardness or elastic properties. I think understanding how shape, orientation and packing could affect the mechanics of these coatings is one of the places where interesting applications could emerge.”

According to Fakhraai, one of the most exciting pieces of this research is the fundamental aspect of now being able to show that there can be amorphous phases that are high density. She hopes she and other researchers can apply their understanding from studying these systems to what would happen in highly aged glass.

“This tells us that we can actually make glasses that have packings that would be relevant to very well-aged glass,” Fakhraai said. “This opens up the possibility of better fundamentally understanding the process by which we can make stable glasses.”

This research was funded by National Science Foundation grants DMR-11-20901, DMR-1206270, CHE-1152488 and DMREF-1628407.


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There is no one holy like the Lord; there is no one besides you; there is no Rock like our God.

Researchers have developed a new computational method to rapidly screen the effects of point mutations in bacteria to make biofuel production more efficient — ScienceDaily

Combining neutron and X-ray imaging gives clues to how ancient weapons were manufactured

Converting fibrous plant waste, like corn stalks and wood shavings, into fermentable simple sugars for the production of biofuel is no simple process. Bacteria must break down tough leaves, stems and other cellulosic matter resistant to degradation to turn them into usable energy.

Helping bacteria become more efficient in this process could result in more affordable biofuels for our gas tanks and sustainable products such as bioplastics. One way to achieve this goal is to re-engineer the bacterial enzyme complexes, called cellulosomes, which serve as catalysts in the degradation process.

In an effort to produce these so-called designer cellulosomes, the international research consortium CellulosomePlus is developing methods to enhance the efficiency of this complex engineering process to make it economically feasible and effective. Consortium researchers from Spain, Poland and Ireland reported their findings for one method recently in The Journal of Chemical Physics, from AIP Publishing.

The researchers focused on the Clostridium thermocellum (C. thermocellum) bacterium. Capable of directly converting cellulose into ethanol, especially at elevated temperatures, the bacterium has garnered much interest as an optimal biofuel catalyst.

Notably, C. thermocellum has a large cellulosome that degrades cellulose through simultaneous action of many enzymes, mostly cellulases. The enzymes are parts of molecules called dockerins, which form non-covalent complexes with various protein domains called cohesin domains. These domains are connected segments of a scaffoldin, a large protein that serves as the cellulosome backbone. Cellulosome function requires the cohesins to be mechanically strong and the cellulases to be effective enzymes in transforming plant waste into sugar.

“One way to design a better cellulosome is to improve the mechanical stability of type-I cohesins and re-engineer the cellulase units,” said Marek Cieplak, co-author of the paper who directs the Laboratory of Biological Physics at the Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences.

The researchers targeted the c7A cohesin of C. thermocellum because it appears to be subjected to more intense mechanical stress than other cohesins and is exceptionally mechanically stable.

A computational method was developed to identify which point mutations, single amino acid replacements, would lead to stronger mechanical stability as well as higher thermodynamic stability. Using all-atom computations, the researchers identified the mutations by systematically replacing all amino acids with either alanine or phenylalanine.

“One interesting result is that the mutations have a non-obvious impact on the internal structure of the protein and thus on the stabilities,” said Mateusz Chwastyk, also one of the publication’s authors and Cieplak’s former student.

Specifically, the changes in the contact map (the list of amino acid pairs that affect conformational dynamics) can be non-local. The best choices were tested experimentally. The researchers also found that adding disulfide bonds, which form between different amino acids in a protein chain, made the protein extremely resistant to stretching.

“Our theoretical method seems to be a valid approximation for screening the effects of mutations in the mechanical and thermal stabilities of proteins,” Cieplak said.

The proposed method is universal, can be applied to multiple mutations, and is currently used to explain properties of bacteria that live in extreme environments.

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Plans fail for lack of counsel, but with many advisers they succeed.

2009 Toyota Tacoma SR-5 | Small Pickup Truck For Sale



2009 Toyota Tacoma for sale! This gently used small Pickup is a 4×4, has the SR-5 trim and is in excellent condition!! Please call Jim Parisi at 314-303-8366 to schedule an appointment. Marshall Ford is located at 1075 W. Terra Lane in O’Fallon, Missouri about 30 miles west of St. Louis in St. Charles county.

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See it RC – Tag Tilt trailer heavy equipment transport. Pulled by a Peterbuilt 8×8



RC Tag Tilt trailer pulled by a Peterbuilt 8×8.
One of a kind.
It can lift/haul a heavy machine. Not enough room for any of my excavators. But that is ok. A couple of my excavators weigh about 80 LBS. Ouch!! Not many RC trailers will haul those heavy machines.
Anyway, this trailer is Awesome!
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Just how much money can you make as an Operating Engineer?


The average salary for an Operating Engineer is $56,060

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However, as it is written: What no eye has seen, what no ear has heard, and what no human mind has conceived — the things God has prepared for those who love him.

Jane Bunn: Dry and warmer weather on the way, 18 tomorrow, 21 Saturday…



Then it changes again on Saturday night.

My weather forecast from Channel 7 Melbourne 6pm news, live from the Royal Melbourne Show, on Thursday 22 September 2016.

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Construction Videos – Viva Entertainment Group Inc. – OTTV Stock Chart Technical Analysis for 07-03-17 – #Construction #Videos



Viva Entertainment Group Inc. – OTTV Stock Chart Technical Analysis for 07-03-17

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Learn how to read stock charts and identify technical patterns as ClayTrader does a quick stock chart review on Viva Entertainment Group Inc. (OTTV). Watch more OTTV Technical Analysis Videos: https://claytrader.com/stock_chart/OTTV/

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Through these he has given us his very great and precious promises, so that through them you may participate in the divine nature, having escaped the corruption in the world caused by evil desires.

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