Business News – Waste and Recycling Jobs: Opportunities Are Plentiful – Environment #Business #News

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(NewsUSA) – Trade and technical positions are the bright, shining stars of the economy these days. They don’t require a college degree, do provide the opportunity for a meaningful career, and they often pay very well.

One industry, in particular, shines brightest among those hiring these positions: America’s waste and recycling business.

“These are great careers,” says Sharon H. Kneiss, president and CEO of the National Waste & Recycling Association. “We do a real service for residents and business owners alike. And business is growing!”

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of waste and recycling collectors is expected to grow significantly over the next seven years. Between 2012 and 2022, more than 21,000 jobs are expected to be created — a 16-percent growth rate.

In 2012, the median annual pay for truck drivers was about $38,000. With overtime, experienced waste and recycling drivers can earn much, much more. Some workers in various cities make upwards of $100,000 when you factor in overtime. And, most jobs in the field offer generous benefits and possibilities for upwards mobility.

Driving a refuse truck generally requires a commercial driver’s license; however, companies are happy to train new recruits.

“The advantages of driving a waste or recycling vehicle are significant: the hours are regular and predictable, the job is local, and it pays well,” Kneiss said. “Plus there’s job security: We’re always going to need good drivers.”

But the opportunities in the waste and recycling industry don’t end there. Mechanics and welders who work on the industry’s fleet are also in significant demand.

For example, the BLS reports that the 2012 median pay for a diesel mechanic was more than $42,000 per year and that the total number of jobs across all industries was expected to grow by 9 percent from 2012 to 2022 — more than 21,000 additional positions.

There are both formal and informal diesel mechanic training programs. In some cases, the company will train you. But there are also a number of programs offered by vocational schools, community colleges and adult education programs.

In addition, mechanics qualified to work on compressed natural gas engines would do well to investigate the waste and recycling industry: It has one of the largest CNG truck fleets in the U.S.

To learn more about opportunities in the waste and recycling industry, go to http://beginwiththebin.org/jobs.



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Construction Videos – Unbelievable Crazy Amazing Agriculture Heavy Equipment – #Construction #Videos

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This video is about UNBELIEVABLE CRAZY AMAZING Agriculture Heavy Equipment. If you wanna see which are THE Most CRAZY AMAZING Agriculture Heavy Equipment watch this video and if you like it hit the like button..

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So Christ was sacrificed once to take away the sins of many; and he will appear a second time, not to bear sin, but to bring salvation to those who are waiting for him.

Construction Videos – Welcome to Kooy Brothers: Experience the Dealer Difference – #Construction #Videos

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For the message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.

Heavy Construction News – Making ferromagnets stronger by adding non-magnetic elements — ScienceDaily – #Construction #News

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Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory discovered that they could functionalize magnetic materials through a thoroughly unlikely method, by adding amounts of the virtually non-magnetic element scandium to a gadolinium-germanium alloy.

It was so unlikely they called it a “counterintuitive experimental finding” in their published work on the research.

“People don’t talk much about scandium when they are talking magnetism, because there has not been much reason to,” said Yaroslav Mudryk, an Associate Scientist at Ames Laboratory. “It’s rare, expensive, and displays virtually no magnetism.”

“Conventional wisdom says if you take compound A and compound B and combine them together, most commonly you get some combination of the properties of each. In the case of the addition of scandium to gadolinium, however, we observed an abrupt anomaly.”

Years of research exploring the properties of magnetocaloric materials, relating back to the discovery of the giant magnetocaloric effect in rare earth alloys in 1997 by Vitalij Pecharsky and the late Karl Gschneidner, Jr., laid the groundwork for computational theory to begin “hunting” for hidden properties in magnetic rare-earth compounds that could be discovered by introducing small amounts of other elements, altering the electronic structure of known materials.

“From computations, we projected that scandium may bring something really unusual to the table: we saw an unexpectedly large magnetic moment developing on its lone 3d electron,” said Ames Laboratory Associate Scientist Durga Paudyal. “It is the hybridization between gadolinium 5d and the scandium 3d states that is the key that strengthens magnetism with the scandium and transforms it to a ferromagnetic state.”

“Basic research takes time to bear fruit. This is an exemplary case when 20 years ago our team started looking into what are called the 5:4 compounds,” said Ames Laboratory group leader and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor Vitalij Pecharsky. “Only now we have learned enough about these unique rare earth element-containing materials to become not only comfortable but precise in predicting how to manipulate their properties at will.”

The discovery could greatly change the way scandium and other ‘conventionally’ non-magnetic elements are considered and used in magnetic materials research and development, and possibly creates new tools for controlling, manipulating, and functionalizing useful magnetic rare-earth compounds.

The research is further discussed in the paper, “Enhancing Magnetic Functionality with Scandium: Breaking Stereotypes in the Design of Rare Earth Materials,” authored by Yaroslav Mudryk, Durga Paudyal, Jing Liu, and Vitalij K. Pecharsky; and published in the Chemistry of Materials.

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Materials provided by DOE/Ames Laboratory. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


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The Lord your God is with you, the Mighty Warrior who saves. He will take great delight in you; in his love he will no longer rebuke you, but will rejoice over you with singing.

Heavy Construction News – Atomic imperfections move quantum communication network closer to reality — ScienceDaily – #Construction #News

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An international team led by the University of Chicago’s Institute for Molecular Engineering has discovered how to manipulate a weird quantum interface between light and matter in silicon carbide along wavelengths used in telecommunications.

The work advances the possibility of applying quantum mechanical principles to existing optical fiber networks for secure communications and geographically distributed quantum computation. Prof. David Awschalom and his 13 co-authors announced their discovery in the June 23 issue of Physical Review X.

“Silicon carbide is currently used to build a wide variety of classical electronic devices today,” said Awschalom, the Liew Family Professor in Molecular Engineering at UChicago and a senior scientist at Argonne National Laboratory. “All of the processing protocols are in place to fabricate small quantum devices out of this material. These results offer a pathway for bringing quantum physics into the technological world.”

The findings are partly based on theoretical models of the materials performed by Awschalom’s co-authors at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest. Another research group in Sweden’s Linköping University grew much of the silicon carbide material that Awschalom’s team tested in experiments at UChicago. And another team at the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology in Japan helped the UChicago researchers make quantum defects in the materials by irradiating them with electron beams.

Quantum mechanics govern the behavior of matter at the atomic and subatomic levels in exotic and counterintuitive ways as compared to the everyday world of classical physics. The new discovery hinges on a quantum interface within atomic-scale defects in silicon carbide that generates the fragile property of entanglement, one of the strangest phenomena predicted by quantum mechanics.

Entanglement means that two particles can be so inextricably connected that the state of one particle can instantly influence the state of the other, no matter how far apart they are.

“This non-intuitive nature of quantum mechanics might be exploited to ensure that communications between two parties are not intercepted or altered,” Awschalom said.

The findings enhance the once-unexpected opportunity to create and control quantum states in materials that already have technological applications, Awschalom noted. Pursuing the scientific and technological potential of such advances will become the focus of the newly announced Chicago Quantum Exchange, which Awschalom will direct.

An especially intriguing aspect of the new paper was that silicon carbide semiconductor defects have a natural affinity for moving information between light and spin (a magnetic property of electrons). “A key unknown has always been whether we could find a way to convert their quantum states to light,” said David Christle, a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Chicago and lead author of the work. “We knew a light-matter interface should exist, but we might have been unlucky and found it to be intrinsically unsuitable for generating entanglement. We were very fortuitous in that the optical transitions and the process that converts the spin to light is of very high quality.”

The defect is a missing atom that causes nearby atoms in the material to rearrange their electrons. The missing atom, or the defect itself, creates an electronic state that researchers control with a tunable infrared laser.

“What quality basically means is: How many photons can you get before you’ve destroyed the quantum state of the spin?” said Abram Falk, a researcher at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Resarch Center in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., who is familiar with the work but not a co-author on the paper.

The UChicago researchers found that they could potentially generate up to 10,000 photons, or packets of light, before they destroyed the spin state. “That would be a world record in terms of what you could do with one of these types of defect states,” Falk added.

Awschalom’s team was able to turn the quantum state of information from single electron spins in commercial wafers of silicon carbide into light and read it out with an efficiency of approximately 95 percent.

The duration of the spin state — called coherence — that Awschalom’s team achieved was a millisecond. Not much by clock standards, but quite a lot in the realm of quantum states, in which multiple calculations can be carried out in a nanosecond, or a billionth of a second.

The feat opens up new possibilities in silicon carbide because its nanoscale defects are a leading platform for new technologies that seek to use quantum mechanical properties for quantum information processing, sensing magnetic and electric fields and temperature with nanoscale resolution, and secure communications using light.

“There’s about a billion-dollar industry of power electronics built on silicon carbide,” Falk said. “Following this work, there’s an opportunity to build a platform for quantum communication that leverages these very advanced classical devices in the semiconductor industry,” he said.

Most researchers studying defects for quantum applications have focused on an atomic defect in diamond, which has become a popular visible-light testbed for these technologies.

“Diamond has been this huge industry of quantum control work,” Falk noted. Dozens of research groups across the country have spent more than a decade perfecting the material to achieve standards that Awschalom’s group has mastered in silicon carbide after only a few years of investigation.

“There are many different forms of silicon carbide, and some of them are commonly used today in electronics and optoelectronics,” Awschalom said. “Quantum states are present in all forms of silicon carbide that we’ve explored. This bodes well for introducing quantum mechanical effects into both electronic and optical technologies.”

Researchers now are beginning to wonder if this type of physics also may work in other materials, Falk noted.

“Moreover, can we rationally design a defect that has the properties we want, not just stumble into one?” he asked.

Defects are the key.

“For decades the electronics industry has come up with a myriad of tricks to remove all the defects from their devices because defects often cause problems in conventional electronics,” Awschalom explained. “Ironically, we’re putting the defects back in for quantum systems.”


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Even though I walk through the darkest valley, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me.

Heavy Construction News – Study looks at bacteria to remove metals from mine-impacted water — ScienceDaily – #Construction #News

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Researchers at Penn State are refining a natural, low-cost process that will help remove some of the most abundant pollutants, such as iron, from mine-contaminated water.

“In this study we researched how quickly ferrous iron was oxidized under set conditions and found out what microbial species lived under these different conditions,” said Bill Burgos, professor of environmental engineering at Penn State. “It’s not only important to know how fast a particular treatment process might be but also which microbes are involved.”

The team enriched iron-oxidizing bacteria from two acid mine drainage sites in Pennsylvania’s Appalachian coal basin and then measured the rates of iron oxidation at low-pH values.

The two sites were Scalp Level, which displayed the highest rate of iron oxidation, and Brubaker Run, which displayed an average rate. Both are in Cambria County.

At each site, the researchers first collected acid mine drainage and surface sediments to be used as “seed” material for microbial enrichments.

“The sediment is the freshly deposited iron oxides that are classically indicative of mine drainage,” Burgos said. “The sediments at Scalp Level hosted a different microbial community than the sediments at Brubaker Run.”

Once in the lab, microbes were extracted from the sediment samples and then enriched using a no-flow, fed-batch bioreactor where ferrous iron was intermittently added to enhance the growth of iron-oxidizing bacteria.

After enrichment, each culture was divided for two sets of experiments, one that varied the pH and another that varied the iron concentration. Using the four reactors (two per site), the researchers measured rates of iron oxidation under different conditions, then compared DNA extracted from biomass samples, noting changes to microbial communities.

“The flow-through experiments allowed us to mimic an engineered bioreactor,” Burgos said.

The results of these experiments, recently published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, showed that different microbial communities enriched from the two sites maintained distinct traits inherited from their respective seed materials. Long-term operation of these two systems did not lead to the same, or even more similar, microbial communities.

However, all of the bioreactors did oxidize iron and remove it at very similar rates. This suggests that the performance of bioreactors for mine-water treatment may not be strongly dependent on the “microbial seed” used for reactor startup.

“It is a sequential process,” Burgos said. “Each microbial community is acting as seeds for the next stage. Importantly, the rates of iron oxidation were essentially the same for the two sites, even though they varied dramatically in the field. What that means is you could go to any site and enrich these microbes in a bioreactor and they are all going to perform in a very similar way.”

From these results, the team was also able to show that certain organisms did indeed do better under certain geochemical conditions.

“There were some organisms that did exceptionally well when the iron concentration was low,” Burgos said. “And there were some organisms that did exceptionally well when the pH was very low, or conversely, they only did well when the pH was high.”

The next step for the researchers is to partner with a mining company and build a larger pilot-scale system.

“When you have exceptionally low pH and exceptionally high iron concentrations, that’s an expensive water to treat,” Burgos said. “The conventional means of doing it are not the most efficient, and they are certainly not the most cost-effective. Biological low-pH iron oxidation is economical and can be seamlessly integrated into an acid mine drainage treatment system.”

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For there is one God and one mediator between God and mankind, the man Christ Jesus.

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Heavy Construction News – Hydrothermal vents, methane seeps play enormous role in marine life, global climate — ScienceDaily – #Construction #News

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The hydrothermal vents and methane seeps on the ocean floor that were once thought to be geologic and biological oddities are now emerging as a major force in ocean ecosystems, marine life and global climate.

However, even as researchers learn more about their role in sustaining a healthy Earth, these habitats are being threatened by a wide range of human activities, including deep-sea mining, bottom trawling and energy harvesting, scientists say in a report published in Frontiers in Marine Science.

Researchers from Oregon State University first discovered these strange, isolated worlds on the ocean bottom 40 years ago. These habitats surprised the scientific world with reports of hot oozing gases, sulfide chimneys, bizarre tube worms and giant crabs and mussels — life forms that were later found to eat methane and toxic sulfide.

“It was immediately apparent that these hydrothermal vents were incredibly cool,” said Andrew Thurber, an assistant professor in the OSU College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, and co-author on the new report.

“Since then we’ve learned that these vents and seeps are much more than just some weird fauna, unique biology and strange little ecosystems. Rather than being an anomaly, they are prevalent around the world, both in the deep ocean and shallower areas. They provide an estimated 13 percent of the energy entering the deep sea, make a wide range of marine life possible, and are major players in global climate.”

As fountains of marine life, the vents pour out gases and minerals, including sulfide, methane, hydrogen and iron — one of the limiting nutrients in the growth of plankton in large areas of the ocean. In an even more important role, the life forms in these vents and seeps consume 90 percent of the released methane and keep it from entering the atmosphere, where as a greenhouse gas it’s 25 times more potent than carbon dioxide.

“We had no idea at first how important this ecological process was to global climate,” Thurber said. “Through methane consumption, these life forms are literally saving the planet. There is more methane on the ocean floor than there are other forms of fossil fuels left in the oceans, and if it were all released it would be a doomsday climatic event.”

In reviewing the status of these marine geological structures and the life that lives around them, a group of researchers from 14 international universities and organizations have outlined what’s been learned in the past four decades and what forces threaten these ecosystems today. The synthesis was supported by the J.M. Kaplan fund.

These vents and seeps, and the marine life that lives there, create rocks and habitat, which in some settings can last tens of thousands of years. They release heat and energy, and form biological hot spots of diversity. They host extensive mussel and clam beds, mounds of shrimp and crab, create some prime fishing habitat and literally fertilize the ocean as zooplankton biomass and abundance increases. While the fluid flows from only a small section of the seafloor, the impact on the ocean is global.

Some of the microorganisms found at these sites are being explored for their potential to help degrade oil spills, or act as a biocatalytic agent for industrial scrubbing of carbon dioxide.

These systems, however, have already been damaged by human exploitation, and others are being targeted, the scientists said. Efforts are beginning to mine them for copper, zinc, lead, gold and silver. Bottom trawling is a special concern, causing physical disturbance that could interfere with seeps, affect habitat and damage other biologic linkages.

Oil, gas or hydrate exploitation may damage seeps. Whaling and logging may interfere with organic matter falling to the ocean floor, which serves as habitat or stepping stones for species reliant on chemosynthetic energy sources. Waste disposal of munitions, sewage and debris may affect seeps.

The range of ecosystem services these vents and seeps provide is just barely beginning to be understood, researchers said in their report. As many of these habitats fall outside of territorial waters, vent and seep conservation will require international collaboration and cooperation if they are going to continue to provide ecosystem benefits.

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Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience.

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Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship.

Heavy Construction News – #reuters #News

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By Scott DiSavino
| NEW YORK

 

NEW YORK Oil futures climbed almost 1 percent on Friday on lift from a falling dollar but remained down for a fifth week in a row and close to a 10-month low as OPEC-led production cuts have failed to substantially reduce a global crude glut.

 

Brent futures LCOc1 were up 40 cents, or 0.9 percent at $45.62 a barrel by 11:52 a.m. EDT (1552 GMT), pushing the front-month out of technically oversold territory for the first time this week.

 

U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude CLc1 was up 37 cents, or 0.9 percent, at $43.11 per barrel.

 

Both Brent and U.S. futures remained on track to decline for a fifth week in a row, which would be the longest slumps for the front-month contracts since August 2015.

 

 

“Crude is getting a good pop off the fall in the dollar,” said Phil Davis, managing partner at PSW Investments in Woodland Park, New Jersey.

 

The U.S. dollar .DXY was down 0.4 percent against a basket of currencies, on track for its biggest daily percentage decline since early June after weaker-than-expected U.S. economic data. This boosted greenback-denominated oil.

 

Still, oil prices remain down about 20 percent this year despite an effort led by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries to cut production 1.8 million barrels per day (bpd).

 

 

That puts the market on course for its biggest first-half percentage fall since the late 1990s, when rising output and the Asian financial crisis led to sharp losses.

 

“We doubt that demand growth will accelerate sufficiently to break the current downward price momentum,” analysts at Bank of America Merrill Lynch said in a note on Friday, citing surprisingly weak recent economic data in the United States, China and Asia.

 

 

OPEC-led efforts to reduce production and end the oil glut have been frustrated by soaring output from the United States and OPEC members Libya and Nigeria, which are exempt from the cuts.

 

Thanks to shale drillers, U.S. oil production C-OUT-T-EIA has risen more than 10 percent in the past year to 9.35 million bpd, close to the level of top exporter Saudi Arabia.

 

“Rising U.S. output continues to stress markets, with increasing evidence that improved efficiency and technology makes many of the shale plays profitable below $40 a barrel,” analysts at Cenkos Securities wrote.

 

(Additional reporting by Karolin Schaps in London and Henning Gloystein in Singapore; Editing by Dale Hudson and David Gregorio)

 

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Surely he took up our pain and bore our suffering, yet we considered him punished by God, stricken by him, and afflicted.

Heavy Construction News – Concentrations are highest in coal from Appalachian Mountains — ScienceDaily – #Construction #News

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A study of the content of rare earth elements in U.S. coal ashes shows that coal mined from the Appalachian Mountains could be the proverbial golden goose for hard-to-find materials critical to clean energy and other emerging technologies.

In the wake of a 2014 coal ash spill into North Carolina’s Dan River from a ruptured Duke Energy drainage pipe, the question of what to do with the nation’s aging retention ponds and future coal ash waste has been a highly contested topic.

One particularly entrepreneurial idea is to extract so-called “critical” rare earth elements such as neodymium, europium, terbium, dysprosium, yttrium and erbium from the burned coal. The Department of Energy has identified these globally scarce metals as a priority for their uses in clean energy and other emerging technologies. But exactly how much of these elements are contained in different sources of coal ash in the U.S. had never been explored.

Researchers from Duke University measured the content of rare earth elements in samples of coal ash representing every major coal source in the United States. They also looked at how much of these elements could be extracted from ash using a common industrial technique.

The results, published online on May 26 in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, showed that coal from the Appalachian Mountains contains the most rare earth elements. However, if extraction technologies were cheap enough, there are plenty of rare earth elements to be found in other sources as well.

“The Department of Energy is investing $20 million into research on extraction technologies for coal wastes, and there is literally billions of dollars’ worth of rare earth elements contained in our nation’s coal ash,” said Heileen Hsu-Kim, the Mary Milus Yoh and Harold L. Yoh, Jr. Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Duke.

“If a program were to move forward, they’d clearly want to pick the coal ash with the highest amount of extractable rare earth elements, and our work is the first comprehensive study to begin surveying the options,” Hsu-Kim said.

The researchers took coal ash samples from power plants located mostly in the American Midwest that burn coal sourced from all over the country, including the three largest sources: the Appalachian Mountains, southern and western Illinois, and the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. The content of rare earth elements was then tested using hydrofluoric acid, which is much stronger and more efficient than industrial methods, but is too hazardous to use on a large scale.

The results showed that ash collected from Appalachian Mountain coal has the highest amount of rare earth elements at 591 milligrams per kilogram (or parts per million). Ash from Illinois and the Powder River Basin contain 403 mg/kg and 337 mg/kg, respectively.

The researchers then used a common industrial extraction technique featuring nitric acid to see how much of the rare earth elements could be recovered. Coal ash from the Appalachian Mountains saw the lowest extraction percentages, while ash from the Powder River Basin saw the highest. Hsu-Kim thnks this might be because the rare earth elements in the Appalachian Mountain coal ash are encapsulated within a glassy matrix of aluminum silicates, which nitric acid doesn’t dissolve very well.

“One reason to pick coal ash from the Appalachian Mountains would be for its high rare earth element content, but you’d have to use a recovery method other than nitric acid,” said Hsu-Kim, who also holds an appointment in Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment. “For any future venture to begin an extraction program, the recovery method will need to be tailored to the specific chemistry of the coal ash being used.”

The Duke researchers also tried “roasting” the coal ash with an alkali agent before dissolving it with nitric acid. Even though the process hadn’t been optimized for recovery purposes, the tests showed a marked improvement in extraction efficiency.

“The reagents we used are probably too expensive to use on an industrial scale, but there are many similar chemicals,” said Hsu-Kim. “The trick will be exploring our options and developing technologies to drive the costs down. That way we can tap into this vast resource that is currently just sitting around in disposal ponds.”

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Materials provided by Duke University. Original written by Ken Kingery. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


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All the believers were one in heart and mind. No one claimed that any of their possessions was their own, but they shared everything they had.

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