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For it has been granted to you on behalf of Christ not only to believe in him, but also to suffer for him.

Business News – Streaming Content Box Cuts Your Cable and Costs – Technology


(NewsUSA) – Cable TV? That was so three years ago.

These days, consumers are opting to cut the cable cord and stream their TV live.

According to a study by Deloitte in Nov. 2014, the stronghold that cable, satellite and telecommunications companies have held over TV programming is giving way to subscription streaming services and products that use this platform.

Some common complaints and reasons for dropping cable service include the high cost of packages, having to watch programs when they are aired, and the inconvenience of multiple desirable shows airing at once.

While cable subscribers have cited live sports as a reason to stick with traditional cable, various professional sports organizations are detecting the shift away from this model, as noted by the NFL’s recent interest in providing streaming content to its consumers.

“The NFL has always been committed to being at the forefront of media innovation,” says NFL commissioner Roger Goodell in a statement. “[W]e are taking another important step in that direction as we continue to closely monitor the rapidly evolving digital media landscape.”

To this end, one company is doing its best to lure customers away from their cable boxes and satellite dishes and, to date, the virtual monopoly that has been in place.

ZUMMBOX 2.0 is a 4K streaming media player with a built-in digital antenna, which allows users to enjoy all of their traditional streaming content, while providing access to free television programming.

The way it works is this: the box essentially serves as a content- aggregating device, featuring a built-in app store, allowing consumers to download a variety of apps and other software that provides access to a diverse range of TV shows, movies, sports, gaming, podcasts, and radio.

Other key features include voice command recognition, Bluetooth compatibility, built-in DVR, and an optical import for surround sound, as well as four USB ports and three memory options.

For parents who are concerned about certain programming, the device includes a parental control feature and complies with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act. The device also complies with the Online Privacy Protection Act, and does not distribute personal information to outside parties without the consent of the user.

Unlike its competitors, there is no contract, no monthly fees and a two-year warranty. The product is available for a one-time payment of $159 and available online exclusively at Fundingotc.com.

Zumm and the creators of the ZUMMBOX 2.0 have been working with Fundingotc.com, a unique full-service crowdfunding platform, to help launch this device.

The difference between Fundingotc.com and other crowdfunding sites is that, instead of a large quantity of campaigns with questionable viability and best efforts deliverables, Fundingotc.com only posts time-to-market technologies and opportunities that have been proven to deliver.

“Time-to-market” means that the companies and products offered on this platform are already tested and past the initial development stage. Fundingotc.com also provides access to extensive marketing capabilities spanning print, radio, TV, affiliate marketing and other media outlets.

Fundingotc.com clients receive full service from copy and posting, to media and advertising. So unlike every other crowdfunding platform, they work to drive traffic to client campaigns.



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World’s first sustainable, industrial-scale agriculture began when crops became dependent on their ant farmers — ScienceDaily – News


Millions of years before humans discovered agriculture, vast farming systems were thriving beneath the surface of the Earth. The subterranean farms, which produced various types of fungi, were cultivated and maintained by colonies of ants, whose descendants continue practicing agriculture today.

By tracing the evolutionary history of these fungus-farming ants, scientists at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History have learned about a key transition in the insects’ agricultural evolution. This transition allowed the ants to achieve higher levels of complexity in farming, rivaling the agricultural practices of humans: the domestication of crops that became permanently isolated from their wild habitats and thereby grew dependent on their farmers for their evolution and survival.

In the April 12 issue of Proceedings of Royal Society B, scientists led by entomologist Ted Schultz, the museum’s curator of ants, report that the transition likely occurred when farming ants began living in dry climates, where moisture-loving fungi could not survive on their own. The finding comes from a genetic analysis that charts the evolutionary relationships of farming and non-farming ants from wet and dry habitats throughout the Neotropics.

About 250 species of fungus-farming ants have been found in tropical forests, deserts and grasslands in the Americas and the Caribbean, and these species fall into two different groups based on the level of complexity of their farming societies: lower and higher agriculture. All farming ants start new fungal gardens when a queen’s daughter leaves her mother’s nest to go off and found her own nest, taking with her a piece of the original colony’s fungus to start the next colony’s farm.

In the lower, primitive forms of ant agriculture — which largely occur in wet rain forests — fungal crops occasionally escape from their ant colonies and return to the wild. Lower ants also occasionally regather their farmed fungi from the wild and bring them back to their nests to replace faltering crops. These processes allow wild and cultivated fungi to interbreed and limit the degree of influence the lower ants have over the evolution of their crops.

vBut, as with certain crops that have been so heavily modified by human breeders that they can no longer reproduce and live on their own in the wild, some fungal species have become so completely dependent on their relationship with farming ants that they are never found living independent of their farmers. These higher agricultural ants cultivate highly “domesticated” crops, enabling them to live in vast communities and to work together through division of labor to fertilize their fungal crops, haul away waste, keep pathogens at bay and maintain ideal growing conditions.

“These higher agricultural-ant societies have been practicing sustainable, industrial-scale agriculture for millions of years,” Schultz said. “Studying their dynamics and how their relationships with their fungal partners have evolved may offer important lessons to inform our own challenges with our agricultural practices. Ants have established a form of agriculture that provides all the nourishment needed for their societies using a single crop that is resistant to disease, pests and droughts at a scale and level of efficiency that rivals human agriculture.”

Today, many agricultural ant species are threatened by habitat destruction, and as part of his studies, Schultz has been collecting specimens from the field and preserving them in the museum’s cryogenic biorepository for future genomic studies. In the current study, he and his colleagues compared the genomes of 119 modern ant species, most of which were collected during his decades of field expeditions.

Using powerful new genomic tools, the scientists compared DNA sequences at each of more than 1,500 genome sites for 78 fungus-farming species and 41 non-fungus-farming species. Their data-rich analysis gave the team a great deal of confidence in the evolutionary relationships they were able to map, Schultz said.

Their analysis clarifies the closest living non-farming relative of today’s fungus-growing ants and allows Schultz and his team to begin to look at the geographic backgrounds of these species and deduce when, where and under what conditions particular traits emerged. In this study, the team was interested in learning when ants began practicing higher agriculture — that is, when some fungal crops came to be dependent on the ant-fungus relationship for survival.

According to the evolutionary tree they constructed, the first ants to transition to higher agriculture likely lived in a dry or seasonally dry climate. The transition appears to have occurred around 30 million years ago — a time when the planet was cooling, and dry areas were becoming more prevalent.

Fungi that had evolved to live in wet forests would have been poorly equipped to survive independently in this changing climate. “But if your ant farmer evolves to be better at living in a dry habitat, and it brings you along and it sees to all your needs, then you’re going to be doing okay,” Schultz said.

Just as humans living in a dry or temperate climate might raise tropical plants in a greenhouse, agricultural ants carefully maintain the humidity within their fungal gardens. “If things are getting a little too dry, the ants go out and get water and they add it,” Schultz said. “If they’re too wet, they do the opposite.” So even when conditions above the surface become inhospitable, fungi can thrive inside the underground, climate-controlled chambers of an agricultural ant colony.

In this situation, fungi can become dependent on their ant farmers — unable to escape the nest and return to the wild. “If you’ve been carried into a dry habitat, your fate is going to match the fate of the colony you’re in,” Schultz said. “At that point, you’re bound in a relationship with those ants that you were not bound in when you were in a wet forest.”

Schultz said the conditions present during this evolutionary transition illustrate how an organism can become domesticated even if its farmers are not consciously selecting for desirable traits as human breeders might do. Ants that moved their fungi into new habitats would have isolated the organism from its wild relatives, just as humans do when they domesticate a crop. This isolation creates an opportunity for the farmed species to evolve independently from species in the wild, adopting new traits.

Funding for this study was provided by the Smithsonian and the National Science Foundation.



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Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves.

Construction Videos – Bobcat Tree Spade



Speed up production and cut labor costs by using the Bobcat® tree spade to turn your loader into a tree-digging, transplanting and loading machine. The overlapping blades let operators dig and transplant trees with speed and efficiency. A compact, short tower design allows the tree spade to easily squeeze between closely-planted trees while maintaining excellent visibility. And, by using integrated joystick controls, operating the tree spade is easier and more comfortable than ever. Built for maximum durability, this attachment is ideal for applications such as nurseries, golf courses, DNRs and parks and recreation departments. For more information, visit http://bobcat.com/yt/treespade.

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Therefore, since we have these promises, dear friends, let us purify ourselves from everything that contaminates body and spirit, perfecting holiness out of reverence for God.

Construction Videos – Deere & Company M/N 6068TF151 Diesel Engine on GovLiquidation.com



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For if, while we were God’s enemies, we were reconciled to him through the death of his Son, how much more, having been reconciled, shall we be saved through his life!

Heavy Construction News – Rare minerals from Siberia found to have same structure as some man-made metal-organic frameworks — ScienceDaily

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One of the hottest new materials is a class of porous solids known as metal-organic frameworks, or MOFs. These human-made materials were introduced in the 1990s, and researchers around the world are working on ways to use them as molecular sponges for applications such as hydrogen storage, carbon sequestration, or photovoltaics.

Now, a surprising discovery by scientists in Canada and Russia reveals that MOFs also exist in nature — albeit in the form of rare minerals found so far only in Siberian coal mines.

The finding, published in the journal Science Advances, “completely changes the normal view of these highly popular materials as solely artificial, ‘designer’ solids,” says senior author Tomislav Friščić, an associate professor of chemistry at McGill University in Montreal. “This raises the possibility that there might be other, more abundant, MOF minerals out there.”

The twisting path to the discovery began six years ago, when Friščić came across a mention of the minerals stepanovite and zhemchuzhnikovite in a Canadian mineralogy journal. The crystal structure of the minerals, found in Russia between the 1940s and 1960s, hadn’t been fully determined. But the Russian mineralogists who discovered them had analyzed their chemical composition and the basic parameters of their structures, using a technique known as X-ray powder diffraction. To Friščić, those parameters hinted that the minerals could be structurally similar to a type of human-made MOF.

His curiosity piqued, Friščić began looking for samples of the rare minerals, reaching out to experts, museums and vendors in Russia and elsewhere. After a promising lead with a mining museum in Saint Petersburg failed to pan out, Igor Huskić, a graduate student in the Friščić research group at McGill turned his attention to synthesizing analogues of the minerals in the lab — and succeeded. But a major journal last year declined to publish the team’s work, in part because the original description of the minerals had been reported in a somewhat obscure Russian mineralogical journal.

Then, the McGill chemists caught a break: with the help of a crystallographer colleague in Venezuela, they connected with two prominent Russian mineralogists: Sergey Krivovichev, a professor at Saint Petersburg State University, and Prof. Igor Pekov of Lomonosov Moscow State University.

Krivovichev and Pekov were able to obtain the original samples of the two rare minerals, which had been found decades earlier in a coal mine deep beneath the Siberian permafrost. The Russian experts were also able to determine the crystal structures of the minerals. These findings confirmed the McGill researchers’ initial results from their lab synthesis.

Stepanovite and zhemchuzhnikovite have the elaborate, honeycomb-like structure of MOFs, characterized at the molecular level by large voids. The two minerals aren’t, however, representative of the hottest varieties of MOFs — those that are being developed for use in hydrogen-fueled cars or to capture waste carbon dioxide.

As a result, Friščić and his collaborators are now broadening their research to determine if other, more abundant minerals have porous structures that could make them suitable for uses such as hydrogen storage or even drug delivery.

In any event, the discovery of MOF structures in the two rare minerals already is “paradigm-changing” Friščić says. If scientists had been able to determine those structures in the 1960s, he notes, the development of MOF materials “might have been accelerated by 30 years.”

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I am torn between the two: I desire to depart and be with Christ, which is better by far; but it is more necessary for you that I remain in the body.

Originally posted 2016-08-05 19:49:36. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Heavy Construction News – Scientist findings may have implications for current remediation strategies — ScienceDaily

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A new study led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego scientist Jane Willenbring challenges the long-held belief that asbestos fibers cannot move through soil. The findings have important implications for current remediation strategies aimed at capping asbestos-laden soils to prevent human exposure of the cancer-causing material.

Willenbring, along with University of Pennsylvania postdoctoral researcher Sanjay Mohanty, and colleagues tested the idea that once capped by soil, asbestos waste piles are locked in place. Instead they found that dissolved organic matter contained within the soil sticks to the asbestos particles, creating a change of the electric charge on the outside of the particle that allows it to easily move through the soil.

“Asbestos gets coated with a very common substance that makes it easier to move,” said Willenbring, an associate professor in the Geosciences Research Division at Scripps. “If you have water with organic matter next to the asbestos waste piles, such as a stream, you then have a pathway from the waste pile and possibly to human inhalation.”

Willenbring will present the new research during her presentation “The Fate of Asbestos in Soil: Remediation Prospects and Paradigms” at the 2016 American Chemical Society Meeting in Philadelphia on Monday, Aug. 22 at 2:10 p.m. in the Philadelphia Downtown Courtyard by Marriott Juniper’s Ballroom.

Asbestos is comprised of six naturally occurring minerals that are formed by thin fibers. Asbestos mining in the U.S. began in the late 19th century and was widely used in a variety of products from insulation to car brake pads.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency currently caps asbestos waste piles with soil to avoid human exposure to the toxic dust that causes a rare cancer called mesothelioma.

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Materials provided by University of California – San Diego. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.



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Then he said to them, “Whoever welcomes this little child in my name welcomes me; and whoever welcomes me welcomes the one who sent me. For it is the one who is least among you all who is the greatest.”

Originally posted 2016-08-19 19:30:38. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Heavy Construction News – Newly discovered ‘Casper’ octopod at risk from deep-sea mining — ScienceDaily

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Last spring, researchers made headlines with the discovery of what was surely a new species of octopod, crawling along the seafloor at a record-breaking ocean depth of more than 4,000 meters (about 2.5 miles) off Necker Island near Hawaii. The octopod’s colorless and squishy appearance immediately inspired the nickname “Casper.” Now, a report published in Current Biology on December 19 reveals that these ghost-like, deep-sea octopods lay their eggs on the dead stalks of sponges attached to seafloor nodules rich in the increasingly valuable metals used in cell phones and computers.

“Presumably, the female octopod then broods these eggs, probably for as long as it takes until they hatch — which may be a number of years,” says Autun Purser of the Alfred Wegener Institute’s Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Germany.

“The brooding observation is important as these sponges only grow in some areas on small, hard nodules or rocky crusts of interest to mining companies because of the metal they contain,” including manganese, he adds. “The removal of these nodules may therefore put the lifecycle of these octopods at risk.”

Purser explains that the deep-sea manganese nodules form similarly to pearls in an oyster. In a process that could take millions of years, metals gradually build up in rocky layers onto a small starting seed, perhaps a shell fragment or a shark’s tooth.

“These nodules look a bit like a potato, and are made up of rings of different shells of metal-rich layers,” Purser says. “They are interesting to companies as many of the metals contained are ‘high-tech’ metals, useful in producing mobile phones and other modern computing equipment, and most of the land sources of these metals have already been found and are becoming more expensive to buy.”

Purser says that little was known about the creatures found in the deep-sea environments where those attractive metals are found. In a series of recent cruises, the researchers set out to find the organisms that live there and to understand how the ecosystem and animals might be impacted by mining activities.

Their studies have shown that octopods are numerous in manganese crust areas, precisely where miners would hope to extract metals of interest. The mineral-biota association that they observed is a first for any octopod lacking fins (a group known as incirrate octopods), and it puts these captivating octopods, which live their long lives at a slow pace, at particular risk.

“As long-lived creatures, recovery will take a long time and may not be possible if all the hard seafloor is removed,” Purser says. “This would be a great loss to biodiversity in the deep sea and may also have important knock on effects. Octopods are sizable creatures, which eat a lot of other smaller creatures, so if the octopods are removed, the other populations will change in difficult to predict ways.”

Purser says that he and his colleagues continue to study the nodules and their importance to microbes and animals both small and large, including starfish, crabs, and fish.

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Materials provided by Cell Press. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.



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I know that my redeemer lives, and that in the end he will stand on the earth.

Originally posted 2016-12-19 18:45:10. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

WIFIA Program Gets 43 Requests, Seeking $6B in Loans | Heavy Construction News

Local water agencies got good news when Congress added $10 million to the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act loan program in the recently enacted omnibus spending bill. The funding boost in the bill, which President Trump signed May 5, gives WIFIA a total of $30 million in direct fiscal 2017 funding. That could help finance $2 billion to $5 billion in infrastructure projects.

The Environmental Protection Agency, which manages WIFIA, said on May 2 it had received 43 letters of interest in the loan program. EPA said the original $20 million would parlay into $1 billion in loans and other credit assistance. Because WIFIA aid can account for only up to 49% of a project’s cost, the 51% in non-WIFIA funding should bring projects’ total to $2 billion. The spending bill’s increase could raise the total even higher. The 43 applications requested more than $6 billion in WIFIA assistance.

EPA expects to complete an initial review by early July. WIFIA aid can be used for a wide range of projects, including drinking water, wastewater treatment and desalination.

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A person finds joy in giving an apt reply— and how good is a timely word!

Originally posted 2017-05-17 18:35:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Construction Videos – Caterpillar, Inc. | Streamlining Processes Through Digital Transformation

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Learn how Perficient client Caterpillar, Inc., digitally transformed its business, streamlining processes for both customers and dealers.

Read the full story here: http://www.perficient.com/work/caterpillar

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Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they?

Heavy Construction News – Discovery could benefit renewable energy, transportation, personal electronics — ScienceDaily

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Modern batteries power everything from cars to cell phones, but they are far from perfect — they catch fire, they perform poorly in cold weather and they have relatively short lifecycles, among other issues. Now researchers from the University of Houston have described a new class of material that addresses many of those concerns in Nature Materials.

The researchers, led by Yan Yao, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, report their use of quinones — an inexpensive, earth-abundant and easily recyclable material — to create stable anode composites for any aqueous rechargeable battery.

“This new material is cheap and chemically stable in such a corrosive environment,” said Yao, who is also a principal investigator with the Texas Center for Superconductivity at UH, with an appointment to the chemical and biomolecular engineering faculty. The material also can be used to create a “drop-in replacement” for current battery anodes, allowing the new material to be used without changing existing battery manufacturing lines, he said.

“This can get to market much faster,” he said.

Yao and his lab, including research associate Yanliang Liang, who served as first author on the paper, began the work in 2013, after he was awarded $1 million from the Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Project Agency — Energy (ARPA-E) RANGE program to develop new battery technology. Other researchers involved in the project include Yan Jing, Saman Gheytani and Kuan-Yi Lee, all of UH, Ping Liu of the University of California-San Diego, and Antonio Faccheti of Northwestern University.

Energy storage is the key to wider adoption of electric cars, wind and solar power, along with other clean energy technologies. But the development of battery storage systems, which would be able to store energy until it is needed and then be recharged with additional generation, has been hampered by the lack of batteries that meet a variety of requirements: environmentally friendly, safe, inexpensive and long-lasting.

“Aqueous rechargeable batteries featuring low-cost and nonflammable water-based electrolytes are intrinsically safe and … (provide) robustness and cost advantages over competing lithium-ion batteries that use volatile organic electrolytes and are responsible for recent catastrophic explosions,” the researchers wrote. But state-of-the-art aqueous rechargeable batteries have a short lifespan, making them unsuitable for applications where it isn’t practical to replace them frequently.

The stumbling block, Yao said, has been the anode, the portion of the battery through which energy flows. Existing anode materials are intrinsically structurally and chemically unstable, meaning the battery is only efficient for a relatively short time.

They worked with quinones, an earth-abundant organic material which Yan said costs just $2 per kilogram, demonstrating the material’s benefits in three formulations.

The differing formulations offer evidence that the material is an effective anode for both acid batteries and alkaline batteries, such as those used in a car, as well as emerging aqueous metal-ion batteries, Liang said. That means the quinones-based anode will work regardless of which technology dominates in the future, he said.

The new material also allows the batteries to work across temperature ranges, Liang said, unlike some conventional aqueous batteries, which are notoriously balky in cold weather.

Yao said consumers would quickly notice one key difference in this change to existing battery technology. “One of these batteries, as a car battery, could last 10 years,” he said. In addition to slowing the deterioration of batteries for vehicles and stationary electricity storage batteries, it also would make battery disposal easier because the material does not contain heavy metals.

The researchers have filed for three patents for the technology and hope to find partners to commercialize the technology.

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Materials provided by University of Houston. Original written by Jeannie Kever. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.



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Walk in obedience to all that the Lord your God has commanded you, so that you may live and prosper and prolong your days in the land that you will possess.